How to Teach English in Eastern Europe – Pros & Cons of Living as an English Teacher

By Two Monkeys Travel - Contributor March 18th, 2020 Posted in Teaching English - TEFL, Travel Blog One Comment

Start a new journey and teach English in Eastern Europe! Countries in Eastern Europe offer not only a fun adventure but a great opportunity to teach English abroad.

How to Teach English in Eastern Europe – A guide to Start Teaching
Photo by Morgan

Eastern Europe is perfect for adventurous English teachers. These are countries where beautiful architecture, landscapes beyond what you see in popular Western Europe, charming cities and towns and rich historical and cultural hotspots. These countries, such as Bulgaria, Croatia, Czech Republic, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, and Slovenia have interesting Christmas traditions and Baltic Spring and Winter festivals. Eastern Europeans are hospitable and friendly people who warmly invite you to their homes and give you gifts as part of the tradition.

Learn more about teaching English abroad, read our article about the introduction to teaching English.

We have also partnered with Let’s TEFL to offer accredited 120-hour TEFL courses with a 60% discount. Just use our exclusive promo code – TWOMONKEYS. Let’s TEFL courses include free certificate shipping!

LetsTEFL

Cost of Living for English Teachers in Eastern Europe

Travelers prefer Eastern Europe over the rest of the countries in Europe because of the low cost of living. This is also what makes it so attractive to be an English Teacher in Eastern Europe.

Accommodation:

  • Poland – Average of $488 a month in the capital city of Warsaw
  • Prague, Czech Republic – rent for one-bedroom in a historic hotel, an average of $617  a month
  • Sarajevo, Bosnia – average rent for single bedroom a month: $320, lower outside the city
  • Albania, Belarus, Bulgaria, Macedonia – an average of $380 a month
  • Kyiv, Ukraine – a flat costs $570 average in a month, lower outside the city
  • Moldova – an average of $265 a month

Food: ranging from $5.00 basic meal to $30 mid-range restaurant meal

Transportation: public transport average of $15 to $16 per trip.

Pros of Teaching English in Eastern Europe

  • Less competition in terms of job hunting
  • Historic cities, grand museums, awesome palaces
  • Low cost of living and travel
  • Language schools may sponsor your work visa, though working with a tourist visa is not technically allowed, it is a common practice among foreigners.

Cons of Teaching English in Eastern Europe

  • Very hot, humid summers and cold, freezing winter
  • Poor infrastructure (some cities)
  • Beyond the quaint old towns lie crumbling building parks of past Communist era
  • No variety of food, food is typically bland in smaller cities.
How to Teach English in Eastern Europe – A guide to Start Teaching
Photo by Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Europe-Africa/U.S. Public Domain

How to Find TEFL English Teacher Jobs in Eastern Europe

It is easier to find an English teaching job in person when you’re already traveling to these places in Eastern Europe. Language institutes need TEFL teachers all year round. However, if you are certified, with teaching experience and a degree, you can also try to apply online to schools and universities.

Where to Teach English in Eastern Europe

Many nationalities can travel to most of these countries (as mentioned in a previous section) visa-free. Many Eastern European people do not speak English, and at this time there is a demand for English teachers in private schools, universities, private institutes.

How to Teach English in Eastern Europe – A guide to Start Teaching
Photo by Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Europe-Africa/U.S. Public Domain

Requirements for English Teachers in Eastern Europe

  • Work permit (some foreigners teach on a tourist visa for 90 to180 days as this is the norm, but technically illegal.)
  • TEFL certified –  not a must, but most employers are looking for this certificate
  • A Bachelor’s degree
  • Teaching experience

How to Process a Visa in Eastern Europe

As mentioned previously, many nationalities can travel to some countries in Eastern Europe, visa-free. Employers may or may not cover your visa to teach English.

How to Teach English in Eastern Europe – A guide to Start Teaching
Photo by Ostap Senyuk

Eastern Europe: Lifestyles, Customs, Do’s and Don’ts

  • Eastern European countries are less wealthier than Western European countries, and they also have a different culture. These countries boast of one of Europe’s richest cultural heritage.
  • Do follow what the locals do. Be observant.
  • Don’t display jewelry on the street.
  • Don’t be surprised that some countries in Eastern Europe do not have modern amenities.

Before you start to teach English in Eastern Europe you can get a TEFL certification online first to prove your relevance. But no worries as we have partnered with Let’s TEFL to offer accredited 120-hour TEFL courses with a 60% discount. Just use our exclusive promo code – TWOMONKEYS. Let’s TEFL courses include free certificate shipping!

TESOL

We have also partnered with World Tesol Academy to provide an online TESOL certification course for the lowest price you will find anywhere – $34 USD! We recognised how badly affected many people around the world have been by the Covid / Coronavirus situation. So, we spent a lot of time discussing with this great company how they could come up with an affordable solution to help people afford the opportunities that an online TEFL / TESOL certification can bring.
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One thought on “How to Teach English in Eastern Europe – Pros & Cons of Living as an English Teacher

  1. Hi,

    I hope all is well.

    I started following your page mid last year and so I aspire to travel like you did and settle in a small country as well. Is there any chance for an undergrad (BSE major in English) to have a decent teaching job in Europe?

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Written by Two Monkeys Travel - Contributor

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